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Help prevent mosquito-borne viruses

Help prevent mosquito-borne viruses

The California Department of Public Health reported 320 human cases of West Nile virus in Los Angeles County in the past two years, which accounts for more than 40% of statewide cases.

The West Nile virus is spread by mosquito bites and can pass unnoticed in many people or create flu-like symptoms. But the virus can also cause serious illness (and even death) in people at greatest risk such as the elderly and those with medical conditions like cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure and kidney disease. 

See the Lakewood CityTV video interview of a Lakewood resident who contracted West Nile virus at www.lakewoodcity.org/WestNileVideo.

In additional to our native mosquito species, vector control officials are concerned about the spread of the invasive, day-biting Aedes mosquito. Aedes mosquitoes can potentially spread diseases like Zika virus, dengue fever, yellow fever and chikungunya. There are no local outbreaks of these virusus in Los Angeles County, but a surge in population of the Aedes mosquito increases the risk.

What can you do?

• Tip and toss all sources of stagnant water on your property--even the smallest--that might hold water where mosquitoes can breed. Mosquitoes can breed in just a few days in standing water in small plant saucers, bird baths, inflatable pools and old tires.
• Install or repair screens on windows and doors so mosquitoes can’t get indoors.
• Wear long-sleeve shirts and pants when outside between dusk and dawn, which is when mosquitoes are most prevalent.
• Apply EPA-registered insect repellents containing ingredients like DEET, Picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus when outside between dusk and dawn. Report untreated, stagnant swimming pools to Lakewood City Hall by calling 562-866-9771, extension 2140, or emailing service1@lakewoodcity.org.

Report problems with mosquitoes to the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District by calling 562-944-9656.

Help public health officials track West Nile virus by reporting dead birds, which can be a sign of the virus in an area, to the California Department of Public Health at 1-877-968-2473.